Per-Anders Pettersson

ON ASSIGNMENT: UGANDA: A LOST GENERATION

TERROR IN NORTHERN UGANDA SERIOUSLY AFFECTS CHILDREN The Lord's resistance army has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years. About 20.000 children have been kidnapped and many forced to be child soldiers and wives to rebels. About 1.6 million people are displaced in Northern Uganda living in about 180 (IDP) camps for displaced people. The children are usually brainwashed a forced to commit gruesome acts on relatives, family and the civil population. This conflict is known as one of the worst in the world but is largely ignored by the international community.

Auma Nancy, age 18, was abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) while walking outside Umyama, a camp for displaced people, in Northern Uganda, 2005. She was seven-month pregnant and four rebels cut her ears, nose, and mouth, and left her bleeding in the bush.
  
A girl touches a wall in a shelter as the sun rises in Gulu, Uganda, 2005. She is one of about 20,000 night commuters that sleep in Gulu town every night, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) that has brought terror to Northern Uganda for over twenty years.
  
Onikalit Constantine, age 38, a father of nine, sits next to his young son in Umyama, a camp for displaced people in Northern Uganda, 2005. The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) accused him of collaborating with the Ugandan army. The rebels cut one of his hands off. The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Many of the abducted people are forced to perform gruesome acts and are usually brainwashed when initiated in the LRA.
     
  
Young school children wait for their teacher during a class at St. Martine Primary School in Laliya, Uganda, 2005. Many children in Northern Uganda are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves.
  
A soldier from the Ugandan National Army interact with refugee children in Pagak, camp for displayed people in northern Uganda, 2005. About 1.5 million people have fled villages and live in about 180 squalid Internally Displaced People (IDP) camps, which has changed rural life in Northern Uganda.
  
Gladys Aromo, age 12, carries a container with drinking water while walking to her house n Lailiya, Uganda, 2005. Gladys is a night commuter, one of about 20,000 children that sleep in Gulu town, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Gladys walks 1,5 hour from her home every day to sleep at Noah’s Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. She is too afraid to sleep in the village as an older sister was earlier abducted. She walks a further 30 minutes every day to attend school.
     
  
Susan Labol (r), age 10, peels cassava as she prepares a meal with her sister Gladys (c), age 12, for the family on in Laliya, a rural village in Northern Uganda, 2005. Susan is a night commuter, one of about 20,000 children that sleep in nearby Gulu town, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Susan walks 1,5 hour from her home village with her sister Gladys every day to sleep at Noah’s Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. They are too afraid to sleep in the village as an older sister was earlier abducted. They walk a further 30 minutes every day to attend school in a nearby village.
  
Susan Labol, age 10, and her sister Gladys, age 12, waits outside the family hut as they are preparing to walk to school in Laliya, Uganda, 2005. They are night commuter, two of about 20,000 children that sleep in Gulu town, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Susan and Gladys walk 1,5 hour from their home every day to sleep at Noah’s Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. They are too afraid of sleeping in the village as an older sister was earlier abducted. They walk a further 30 minutes every day to attend school in a nearby village.
  
Children play outside huts in a heavy rainfall in Laliya, a poor rural village in northern Uganda, 2005. Many children in this area are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves.
     
  
Susan Labol, age 10, hugs her little sister outside her family's hut in Laliya, a rural village in Northern Uganda, 2005. Susan is a night commuter, one of about 20,000 children that sleep in Gulu town, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Susan walks 1.5 hours from her home village with her sister Gladys, age 12, every day to sleep at Noah's Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. They are too afraid to sleep in the village as an older sister was earlier abducted.
  
Susan Lambol, age 10, looks out of a window in a shelter as the sun sets in Gulu, Uganda, 2005. Susan is one of about children 20,000 that sleep in Gulu town every night, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Some children walk for hours from their home every day to sleep at Noah’s Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. Susan’s older sister was earlier abducted and she walks about 1.5 hours in each direction everyday from her village.
  
Children leave a shelter to walk back to their villages as the sun rises in Gulu, Uganda, 2005. They are some of about 20,000 night commuters that sleep in Gulu town every night, as they are afraid of being abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The rebel group has brought terror to Northern Uganda for almost twenty years, fighting the Ugandan government. The victims are usually children, which are abducted and used as child soldiers and sex slaves. Some children walk for hours from their home every day to sleep at Noah’s Arch, an NGO housing children in Gulu. They are too afraid to sleep in the villages.